Live at FYF Fest, Day 3: Iggy Pop, Nine Inch Nails, Blonde Redhead, Ty Segall and more

Live Reviews
07/31/2017
Victoria Holt
Iggy Pop // all photos by Victoria Holt (view set)

review by Charlie Zaillian

After Missy Elliott and Frank Ocean’s triumphs the first two nights of FYF ’17, and an impressively self-choreographed main stage set by the author of one of last year's most buzzed about albums (Solange's A Seat at the Table), rock music — that old bedrock of the annual L.A. event informally known as Fuck Yeah Fest but these days, just another genre — finally got the last word.

Iggy Pop

You don’t turn down an opportunity to see a living legend like Iggy Pop. You just don’t. Coming out guns blazing with his Stooges’ ’69 three-chord classic “I Wanna Be Your Dog,” the perpetually shirtless punk rock king (seriously, does Iggy even own shirts?) dealt us a not-surprisingly hit-heavy setlist that included more Stooges (“TV Eye,” “Search and Destroy”) and of course “Lust for Life,” a song he’s played so many times in his life he probably sings it in his sleep. Not even the best closed-captioning in the world could pick up a word of Pop’s between-song mumbling, and there was a hilarious “dude, where’s my mic” moment towards the end of the set. But the man never phones it in, somehow managing to seem very much his age (70 this year) and half that at the same time.

Iggy Pop

Iggy Pop

Ty Segall
Ty Segall

Setting the table for Pop on the Lawn Stage was ultra-prolific garage rocker Ty Segall — a FYF regular making his fifth appearance at the festival — whose fuzzed-out tunes spurred a good-natured mosh pit. Over at the Trees, U.K. mop-tops Temples’ backwards-gazing set of Beatlesque psych was enjoyable, if a little lightweight.

Ty Segall

Temples
Temples

Temples

Little Dragon
Little Dragon

One group that broke from Sunday’s “rock day” narrative was Little Dragon, playing its second FYF but first on the main stage. The trade-off was that it was at six p.m., with the sun still beating down on the blacktop and temps in the 80s — a slightly incongruous setting for the Swedes’ nocturnal, synth-heavy sound, which contrasts entrancing long-form vibe-outs with forays into more straightforward ‘80s pop. Still, singer Yukimi Nagano ranked among the most charismatic frontpeople in a weekend jam-packed with them, with an elaborate, eye-popping onstage ensemble to rival Friday headliner Björk’s.

Little Dragon

Little Dragon

Blonde Redhead
Blonde Redhead

While most of the day’s action was on the main stages we did venture back to the Club to catch Blonde Redhead, who we were delighted to find were playing their 2000 art-rock opus Melody of Certain Damaged Lemons in full. That sleeper hit record — which found the New York three-piece maturing out of its sonic youth, if you will, into something moodier, weirder, more sensual — has aged beautifully. The band looked great too — flanked by golden lights pointing into giant umbrellas — and drew one of the biggest crowds of the weekend on that stage.

Blonde Redhead

Blonde Redhead

Run the Jewels
Killer Mike and El-P of Run the Jewels

We then returned to the Lawn Stage for Run the Jewels. When the incendiary hip-hop duo played FYF two years ago they were must-see status; by now, though, El-P and Killer Mike are on the verge of overexposure, having seemingly never met a fest they didn’t like — this was their second gig this weekend after doing Seattle’s Capitol Hill Block Party Friday. The dueling MCs still make for a good hang and their set Sunday didn’t lack energy or sincerity, but could’ve benefitted from a rumored repeat cameo from Zack de la Rocha — the Rage Against the Machine main man, local L.A. hero and sometime RTJ collaborator who’d joined them onstage in ’15 — that unfortunately never materialized.

Run the Jewels Crowd
The crowd at the Lawn Stage for Run the Jewels

Run the Jewels

Run the Jewels

Nine Inch Nails
Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails

And finally, the band the majority of Sunday day pass-holders came to see (you could ID them by their well-worn concert T-shirts; seriously, they were everywhere): Nine Inch Nails.

Twenty-three years removed from 1994’s quadruple-platinum The Downward Spiral, NIN’s voice, face and visionary Trent Reznor continues to make vital records primarily with his fans in mind while leveling up on the live show, the band’s last tour, for 2013’s Hesitation Marks, garnering as much attention for its multimedia achievement as its music.

Nine Inch Nails Shirts at FYF Fest

Nine Inch Nails

The industrial-rock icons’ first major performance since that '13 tour, Sunday’s catalog-spanning, festival-closing main-stage set didn’t skimp on hits, serving up potent versions of nihilist anthems “Head Like A Hole,” the devastating “Hurt” and, of course, X-rated “Closer” — Reznor’s “Lust for Life” — and vintage album tracks including 1989’s sorrowful “Something I Can Never Have” and Spiral’s mathy, thrashing “March of the Pigs.” It also caught up casual fans on the group’s more recent exploits, from pretty new (hard-charging mid-set standout “Copy of A,” off Hesitation Marks) to brand-new (“Less Than,” the sleek lead single off just-released EP Add Violence). In its last act, Reznor humbly paid tribute to his late friend David Bowie — the two artists met in ’95 when Bowie took NIN on tour and stayed close until his death last year — with a stark cover of “I Can’t Give Everything Away,” the final song off the Starman’s swan song Blackstar, on which he sang the verses alone then superimposed Bowie’s original vocal onto the chorus.

Nine Inch Nails Shirts at FYF Fest
Not the Actual Events is the first of a three-part EP series to be released by Nine Inch Nails; the third is set to be completed by the end of 2017

Nine Inch Nails Shirts at FYF Fest
Add Violence is the second release in the three-part EP series

Nine Inch Nails

Reznor’s pain and torment have always come off as genuine, but in his younger years, also so morose it bordered on humorous at times. Today, in middle age, the music — even the same songs — felt less about wallowing than getting back up and surviving. By NIN’s standards Sunday’s show might’ve been an uncharacteristically no-frills production, but for the overstimulated, delirious masses who stuck around, was just what was needed to end the weekend on a powerful, poignant note.

Related News & Reviews

Live Reviews

Capitol Hill Block Party, Day 2: Cosmos, Prom Queen, Manatee Commune, Whitney

BSH. BSH. BSH. BSH. The sound of four defiant cymbal crashes spreads out across Pike Street. It's Seattle band COSMOS’ turn at the main stage. Melding hip hop, jazz, and funk in a high-energy set, the Seattle band proves yet again why they won last year’s Sound Off! contest, an annual battle of t...


Read More
Click anywhere to return to the site